Come to DrupalCon Latin America 2015

I've been privileged to attend almost every DrupalCon since Barcelona in 2007. I missed Paris in 2009, but I had a good excuse - my wife was due to give birth to our first child around the same time.

The relocation of the Commerce Guys headquarters to Paris has given me plenty of time to catch up on the missed sightseeing, but I still need to figure out how to get to Sydney after missing that one. Lol

Without access to those hundreds of Drupal developers and enthusiasts in 2007, I never would have known anyone was even using Ubercart. I didn't know how to engage other developers remotely (my early forays into IRC were similar to webchick's, I believe), and there wasn't much going on in Louisville, KY where I called home. Meeting others in the Drupal community, learning from my peers, and being mentored directly by many of the same has grown me personally and professionally in ways I never would have expected.

That's why I'm excited about the opportunity to travel to Bogotá, Colombia for the first DrupalCon in Latin America, February 10-12. I can't wait to hear the keynotes from both Dries and Larry, two of my Drupal heroes, and to learn more about the latest developments in Drupal 8 core and contributed modules.

I'll personally be addressing two topics: Drupal Commerce 2.x for Drupal 8 (on behalf of bojanz) and growing a Drupal based product business. I also look forward to the conversations, shared meals, and sprints that make the conference so rewarding.

I strongly encourage you to come if you're in a position to do so! Smile

With the help of Carlos Ospina, I've recorded a personal invitation in Spanish that I trust doesn't have me saying anything embarrassing. I'm sure my Spanish will be better for at least a week after spending time at the conference. Tongue

Next Steps for Drupal Commerce

It was my pleasure to demo Commerce Kickstart 2.x at DrupalCon Munich as I presented Next Steps for Drupal Commerce. The relaunched distribution has been a long time coming, and I couldn't be happier with the release our Kickstart team at Commerce Guys has produced. They've proven the idea that we could keep the core of Drupal Commerce a slim eCommerce framework and wrap it in a usability layer that makes it both attractive and easier to administer.

Beyond the sheer amount of polish that has gone into the UI from the installer to the "Shiny" administration theme, its two most exciting features for me are the Inline Entity Form and Views Megarow functionality.


An inline entity form on a product display node with multiple variations.

Inline Entity Form allows us to embed product details forms inside node forms, simplifying the product vs. product display architecture that has made Drupal Commerce notorious (and truly flexible). I could write a whole post about just how we've implemented it, but I'll save the gory details for a later time.

I will at least point out that if this were a single value product reference field, instead of the drag-and-drop table pictured here, the module would simply embed the product related form elements directly into the node form.


A Views Megarow in action after clicking the "Quick Edit" link.

An equally impressive technical implementation, Views Megarow makes it simple to edit groups of products and orders inline in a View through some fancy AJAX row expansion. It gives you easy access to bulk product edit forms and order summaries complete with order activity streams and administrator comments.

Both of these features have been meticulously planned, designed, user tested, and revised to provide a very streamlined user experience for store administrators. With my time mostly focused on other development, I happily applaud our team for putting out such high quality work.

However, even with this release under our belts, we're hardly ready to sit back and relax. We have plenty more to do in the development of Drupal Commerce distributions, contributed modules, and the core framework itself. I spent the final part of my session at DrupalCon proposing the topics and timeline under consideration for a Drupal Commerce 2.x roadmap targeting Drupal 8.

To make sure we're meeting these challenges head on, I proposed a Commerce 2.x planning and development sprint at our offices in Paris in mid-October. The primary goal of the sprint is to research and plan development on Drupal 8, including how to best utilize and work with the various core initiatives, what new modules to add as dependencies or bring into core as new features, and what core code needs refactoring.

This sprint is on the calendar for October 15-19, and while we likely won't be laying down a lot of code, we're still looking for collaborators. We're particularly interested in folks with experience developing for Drupal Commerce on Drupal 7, bonus points awarded to those who have had to work around its limitations.

I'll post more on the topic in the near future, including specific items we intend to address in 2.x development. In the meantime, it's about time for a Commerce 1.4.

Minding my Peas and Queues

As it turns out, I really enjoyed my time in London. Getting to visit old, historic cities is quite a treat for someone from the Midwest in the U.S.A. There are no castle towers on hills or centuries old steeples gracing my skyline in Louisville, KY, and I'm quite a sucker for both. Getting to visit the Tower of London, which supplies arms to my local museum, turned out to be a special treat. I'm also a sucker for good food and drink (who isn't?), and while it's not the height of elegance, my first experience of fish and chips with mushy peas was good, too. Note to Americans: it's mush-y, not moosh-y.

Fish and chips with mushy peas. Mmm!
Fish and chips courtesy of The George.

My first couple of days in London were my busiest. I delivered a Drupal Commerce training to a room full of students with Greg Beuthin (a.k.a. smokinggoat), our in-house trainer par excellence. Unfortunately, he and I both had sniffles and scratchy throats, so I can only imagine what those reviews will say about our delivery... C'est la vie. We survived, but my day was only just getting started by the end.

For most of the next day and a half I was minding my queue in preparation for the 1.0 launch of Drupal Commerce. With the help of Bojan Zivanovic and Damien Tournoud (and a few others throughout the day), we were able to close out a variety of issues and ensure all of our automated tests were passing when we finally packaged the 1.0. In a feat of endurance sure to be remembered for ages to come, Damien and I outlasted Bojan's youthful energy to finalize the release after postponing dinner for a couple hours. That's what experience gets you, folks.

Excited Damien
An excited Damien is never too hungry to celebrate.
Proud father
It's a boy! He weighs 8 lbs. 6 oz. and is 22" long!

Coming to DrupalCon to collaborate with the other Commerce Guys and the various contributors from across Europe was the greatest part for me. Without the community, we wouldn't have the 1.0 that we do, a solid e-commerce framework that is not limited to a particular use case or locality. We're standing on the shoulders of Drupal core, the contributions of Merfago, and the dozens of patch contributors who have helped ensure Commerce can accommodate all those crazy taxes around the world. I also personally wouldn't have known that mushy peas are better with malt vinegar mixed in without John Albin Wilkins.

With the 1.0 out, my attention is now focused on ensuring our essential contributed modules are ready for use. I'm focusing specifically on making product administration simpler, ensuring Commerce Shipping supports calculated shipping quotes, and pushing code upstream from a local project into Commerce Addressbook. I always have a half dozen payment related projects in the works, too.

If you want to hear more about Drupal Commerce in person, I'll be talking about the project as an international community success story at DrupalCamp Atlanta. I'm busy compiling statistics on committers and contributions to share along with my usual hand-waving, mile-a-minute overview of the modules' functionality.

I'll also deliver a show-and-tell style training at this year's Do It With Drupal in NYC. I love DIWD as a more intimate gathering of module authors, core contributors, and web pros from outside the Drupal community. It's a great place for attendees to soak in a wealth of information and run their project needs by the folks writing the code they'll use. Today is the last day for early bird pricing, so if you're on the fence, you may as well make the impulse buy and come hang out in New York with us.

I hope to see many of you at those events and many more minding the queues.

Breathing British Air

At long last I'm breathing British air and getting psyched for tomorrow's Drupal Commerce training. I lived in the UK for four years as a child but only have vague memories of a nanny and getting AG Bear and My Buddy for Christmas. I didn't come back with a nanny, but I did bring along my wife to help take care of me and my daughter to carry the dolls. We spent a few days in Paris recovering from jetlag, ringing in our fifth year of marriage, and finalizing training arrangements before riding the Eurostar to London with the rest of the team this afternoon.

We'll have a total of fourteen Commerce Guys at DrupalCon London, meaning we'll have plenty of people on hand to talk about Drupal Commerce. In addition to tomorrow's training, we'll be presenting / discussing the Commerce modules and contribs in BoF sessions throughout the week. To see the line-up, check the BoF schedule under Room 334. If we can record or screen capture anything from these, they'll end up on the Commerce Guys Vimeo channel.

I'm looking forward to the Developing with Drupal Commerce session on Thursday, because it will be me first go at leading a panel discussion instead of introducing all things Drupal Commerce in a solo, hand-waving, water-guzzling presentation.

I'll be joined by several other developers and business owners who have been bidding on and building Drupal Commerce sites since the alpha and beta releases. We're now gearing up for a 1.0 release thanks to the hard work and contributions of everyone on the panel. It should be valuable and entertaining to hear them talk about what it's like to develop with Drupal Commerce and how the core modules have evolved since they've been working with them.

Last but not least, for everyone who doesn't care a lick about e-commerce but likes Indian food, I have discovered the best Indian place in Croydon. Look no further than The Spicy Affair for a fair-priced, keenly seasoned meal (with a surprisingly kid friendly wait staff!). That's probably the most controversial statement I made in this blog post, and I can't defend it as though I'm some sort of connoisseur. If you know a better place, feel free to link it in. Otherwise I'll see you there.

Pages