Quick Updates on Reading and Easter

The weeks since the Drupalcon have been a blur, but now I'm fairly well without an excuse for not posting to the blog. I've kept quite busy with work, church, and home related activities, and I think I've started at least a couple blog posts that never saw the light of day. Perhaps for now I'll simply say a blurb about two books I'm reading, post a short poem I wrote for my pastor while he studied for tomorrow's sermon in the same coffee shop as Christina and me, and write a summary thought related to Easter.

First, I'm reading (and recommend) The Reason for God: Belief in an Age of Skepticism by Tim Keller. He's a pastor in NYC, and the book is essentially an apology for the Christian faith that urges readers of all dispositions (Christians and atheists alike) to examine the claims their beliefs make (whether for or against Christianity) and hold them up to equal scrutiny. I'll post further on this book once I'm finished.

I'm also reading The Cross and Christian Ministry: Leadership Lessons from 1 Corinthians on the recommendation of one of my pastors. It's an incredible book that I'd skimmed before but never really dove into. It's essentially an exposition of 1 Corinthians that is comprehensive and rich, showing without a doubt that Christian ministry ought to be centered around the cross of Jesus Christ. Here in the cross, the wisdom of God and the power of God are clearly displayed through Jesus when he seems at his weakest and most foolish before men. However, God used and continues to use this event to transform men and women's lives, and it's a joy to have a part in such ministry.

The poem I wrote is inspired by the reading I've done and also by 2 Corinthians 2:14-17. It's in lymeric form, but it hardly qualifies as a lymeric beyond rhyme and meter:

A preacher's a man with a story to tell,
And he preaches best who knows the tale well.
So read oft the story,
The gospel of glory,
And spread it in Christ with a heavenly smell.

You'll have to read the referenced passage to make sense of the last line. Wink

Finally, Easter. It was a wonderful time, my first ever actually spent in my home church. I've been in the habit the last several years of driving to my grandparents' in Abingdon, VA to celebrate the day. This year, Christina and I stayed home and enjoyed a wonderful service here at Immanuel. I'll post a link to the sermon as soon as it gets posted on our church's website!

I was reminded of Psalm 22 and the particularly ministry that passage had to me in a time of depression. Here I met Jesus as a tortured soul, someone who could feel and share in the deepest hurts any of us feel. I was intending to write a full post strictly related to this remembrance, but I never got the chance. Suffice it to say that it was very satisfying and healing for me to know in my trouble the fellowship of Jesus as a suffering savior... not feeling at all like he ever looked down on me for the inferiority of my suffering. Instead, it is the suffering, bruised reed that Jesus will not break until he leads justice to victory. We see a foretaste of that in the cross and will have our healing consummated in heaven.

Comments

Hey Ryan!

I'm a pastor and I do free-lance web designer on the side, and I have been lurking around Ubercart for about a year now. Well, I have to build an e-commerce site for a client (my first one) and I'm going to plunge into Ubercart.

I'm reading Keller's book also. It's outstanding. I like Ravi Zacharias, but sometimes Ravi can wander in his writing. I personally find Keller's book easier to track with, and more transferable. I've already put his first couple of chapters to good use in discussions I'm having with folks...i.e. everyone has a "faith" - the question is - is the object of your faith solid?

Anyway, I am incredibly impressed with what you guys have accomplished with Ubercart, and it's very cool to see that you are a man of faith as well.

Awesome, Fred! Thanks for stopping by and taking the time to post. Smile Our pastor has also been sprinkling his sermons with insights from Keller's book, and I imagine it will make its way into plenty of mine and my wife's conversations in the future.

Be sure to post a help message in the forums if you ever get stuck in Ubercart!